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Author Archive for: Lynn

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Sneak Peek: The Science of Health, Happiness and Productivity

by Catherine Roscoe Barr

Words are meaningless without defining their meaning in a way that holds value for you.

I hope the title of my upcoming talk on February 15, The Science of Health, Happiness and Productivity, has sparked enough interest for you to keep reading!

The words “health”, “happiness” and “productivity” are often thrown around willy-nilly, but if you really stop to think about it, aren’t they incredibly valuable factors you want present in your life?

Let me elaborate.

Science is the systematic knowledge of the physical world gained through observation and experimentation.

When you treat your life like a science experiment, you can figure out exactly what you need to make it extraordinary.

Through observation and experimentation, you can figure out exactly what serves you and what doesn’t; what fuels you and what drains you.

Using the data you gather, you can create an action plan that contains the conditions perfectly suited to your unique needs, and will produce incredible levels of health, happiness and productivity.

I define health as mental, physical and spiritual vitality.

Without the right knowledge and tools, mental stress can crush your vitality – but there are powerful strategies I’ll share to trim and transform stress to your advantage.

Movement, nutrition and sleep are critical to physical vitality, but don’t need to be complicated or time-consuming – and work best when viewed as indulgent and not deprived.

Gratitude and connection must be present for maximum spiritual vitality. Discovering what you need and having gratitude for what you have are beautiful, transformative practices.

I define happiness as a rich, diverse and acknowledged emotional spectrum that rests in a place of joy.

Research suggests that a diverse emotional ecosystem – called emodiversity – is associated with greater mental and physical health, self-awareness and resilience.

When you learn how to recognize, honour and process your emotions, you can flow through the spectrum from negative to positive emotions more easily – and not get stuck in the trenches of worry, anxiety and fear.

I define productivity as getting the most out of each moment, in both your personal and professional lives. When you bring presence and focus to every thing you do – whether it’s pause to enjoy a beautiful sunset, create an artistic masterpiece, truly listen to a friend, or secure a lucrative deal – you get the very most out of this one, precious life.

I hope that connecting with the science of health, happiness and productivity will bring more meaning and value to your life, and look forward to seeing you on February 15!

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A Bottle of Her Own – Stories from Sommelier Joanne DiGeso

“I drink Champagne when I'm happy and when I'm sad. Sometimes I drink it when I'm alone. When I have company I consider it obligatory. I trifle with it if I'm not hungry and drink it when I am. Otherwise, I never touch it -- unless I'm thirsty.”   - Lily Bollinger

I am attracted to wonderful stories and to real connections with people. It could be why I love learning about wine! Wine is not only experiencing it on your tongue but it is also a collision between family, history, land and culture. In “A Bottle of Her Own: Exceptional Wines & the Women Who Make Them” seminar, we will take an adventure from South Africa to Uruguay and Argentina to Champagne and more. We will also stop to explore wines from our own backyard of British Columbia. Here is a highlight of some of the stories and bottles that will be shared.

The famous Dame Veuve (widow) Clicquot took over the wine estate in 1805 after her husband’s death. At the time, it was only possible for a women to hold property (or a bank account for that matter) if her husband had passed away.

Clicquot took over the business in the middle of the Napoleonic Wars and she was bankrupt. She went to her father-in-law and secured a loan for a million dollars. But by the time she was blending the wine from the famous 1811 harvest, she was going broke, again. By this time, Clicquot knew that Napoleon was losing and waged that the Russian conquerors would become their next big customers. So she bet everything she had and sent her wine to Amsterdam for housing. The war had caused a naval blockade and the ports for transporting wine and goods were closed. When the war ended, Clicquot was weeks ahead of all of her competitors as she sent shipments of her wine to Russia. She quickly established her brand as the favourite of Tsar Alexander I.

The idea that a woman could only hold a bank account when her husband passed away is only a somewhat palatable idea when we are referring to the early 19th century. Yet, in many places in the world, the transition of women leaders in wine is quite recent.

25 years ago, for example, there were no female winemakers in Argentina. When Susana Balbo went to enology school in the early 80’s, out of 33 students, there were 17 women. She was the only woman that graduated. Taking the classes meant you had to take a bus past the 10 pm curfew. Argentina was still under the military dictatorship of the Dirty War and women were particularly vulnerable at night.

After graduation, Balbo had trouble finding a job as a winemaker. Her first opportunity came from a winery in Salta, only because a Paris firm was doing the headhunting. After her first vintage, she gained the title, “The Queen of Torrontes”. Today, she has many brands under her belt, one with her name on it, the Ben Marco wines, Dominio del Plata and Crios.

As you may know, Argentina is famous for its wine made from Malbec and Torrontes. Yet for anyone who has been there, it is often Cabernet Franc that wins the hearts of sommeliers. At this seminar, we will try a Catena ‘Los Carlos’ Cabernet Franc from 4th generation proprietor Laura Catena. I’ll save Laura’s fascinating life story for those of you coming to the seminar on Monday (I can’t share all of my secrets with you!!).

I can tell you that Cabernet Franc from Argentina is new to the British Columbia market and it’s worth checking out. In these high altitude vineyards, the Cabernet Franc receives a long hang time in close proximity to the sun. They are richer, rounder and have none of the green notes you see in cooler climes where Cabernet Franc is usually grown.

Overall, we have 9 stunning wines and 9 unforgettable stories to share.  We will try the new release from Veuve Clicquot house at the seminar. We will savour a Malbec from Susana Balbo and a Cabernet Franc from Laura Catena alongside Heleen Pannekoek’s Cabernet Franc from Fort Berens Winery, Lillooet. Hope to see you there!

[A Bottle of Her Own: Exceptional Wines & the Women Who Make Them is on Monday, November 14th at the Whistler Conference Center 5:30-7:00 Tickets are $47 at whistlercornucopia.com.  A Networking Session with wines from Les Dames D’Escoffier Vancouver Chapter to follow from 7:00-7:30]

Joanne DiGeso – Bio

Joanne has one foot firmly placed in Whistler and the other in Vancouver. She recently returned from Verona as a certified Italian Wine Ambassador from VinItaly International Wine Academy. She is a recipient of both Les Dames D’Escoffier and the British Columbia Hospitality Foundation scholarships. You can usually find Joanne nurturing wine exploration as a sommelier at Hawksworth Restaurant.  A dedicated wine lover, Joanne writes for her website SommWine and is a Wine and Spirits Education Trust Diploma Candidate who aspires to one day becoming a Master of Wine.

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Cognitive Biases – How to Clear the Fog and Make Better Decisions

When I heard the topic for the upcoming Women of Whistler event, I was fascinated and frankly a bit confused at the same time. Cognitive bias? What exactly is that? Apparently these are the little tricks and shortcuts our brain produces. And apparently these can cause some serious problems when making decisions. So even though I thoroughly research, carefully weigh options and think through potential outcomes, there is still something (unknown to me) messing up my decisions? Wow. I need to learn more about this please.

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An article was posted online detailing common cognitive biases and a few examples stuck out. The Information Bias is the tendency to seek information when it does not affect action. More information is not always better. (Perhaps when I am looking to purchase a new laptop, I should not look at every model ever produced in the last three years and it might take me less than six months to decide.) Or The Bandwagon Effect: The probability of one person adopting a belief increases on the number of people who hold that belief, commonly called Groupthink. Perhaps why meetings are often unproductive. The full article can be found at http://mentalfloss.com/article/68705/20-cognitive-biases-affect-your-decisions

Claire Booth will be sharing her insights with the Women of Whistler on September 29. When reading Claire’s bio, I learned she has spent thousands of hours analyzing human behaviour and has years of market research experience. During the event, she will help us identify our cognitive biases, look at our problems from a different angle and help us figure out how to remove these biases.

Sign me up please.

I always enjoy the Women of Whistler events because they combine learning and inspirational speakers with a great networking opportunity among local businesswomen. The next event is Thursday September 29, 6-8 pm at the Maury Young Arts Centre. I am going to www.womenofwhistler.com to register right now. Hope to see you there!

Lynn Gadsby

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Breaking Trail with the Women of Whistler

 Unconventional Career Wisdom from Whistler Women

Women of Whistler

Most people will agree that Whistler is a very unique place in the world.  We do things a bit differently here, don’t we?  Our mountain playground is the center of many local social and business lives.  Our challenges are different too, such as getting in a few turns before work or consistently struggling with keeping good local staff.  So I think it makes sense that a career path carved out in Whistler would be a bit unique too.

What does a Whistler career path look like anyway?

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